Essays Biological And Chemical Warfare

Advantages Of Chemical And Biological Weapons

Chemical and Biological Weapons are Your FriendsAs we go on our daily lives, terrorists are buying and developing dangerous and hazardous biological and chemical weapons to obliterate us. They do not care who they harm; their mission is to cause terror, to spread chaos, to engulf the world in anarchy. They want to know that they are making people terminally ill and sick. They will be enjoying a job well done while your skin is covered with excruciating painful blisters, or while you tell your loved ones that everything will be fine when there will clearly be a fatal result.

Chemical and biological warfare has been around for many centuries. This type of warfare is not new. The Chinese, Greeks, and indigenous groups from South America used it. Whether it was arrows tipped with toxins, or the catapulting bacteria infested bodies, or the burning of toxic chemicals, each had its own deadly way of taking out the enemy. (Solomon 5-6) The U.S. should not stop developing biological and chemical weapons.

Chemical and Biological warfare is most useful for taking out enemy personnel behind enemy lines. Al Mauroni’s book, Chemical and Biological Warfare, states, “The larger artillery projectiles […] might use mustard, VX, or thickened GD to contaminate areas behind enemy forces, threatening their ability to resupply or to reinforce a particular sector” (108). It is an inexpensive way to eliminate foes compared to sending in an army battalion and risk losing human lives. The biggest benefit from using biochemical weapons, as opposed to sending in persons to do the attacking, is that you can be far away from the danger of combat, and thereby limit exposure to your own troops. The biochemical strike can be executed from either a long-range cruise missile or you can have a stealth bomber deliver it to the exact point where the enemy is situated. This way the U.S. military have less casualties and losses.

To further understand how to protect ourselves, we must develop these weapons and test them. There is no way...

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History of Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical (NBC) Reconnaissance

1044 words - 4 pages CBRN Reconnaissance Platoon There is a long and rich history of Nuclear, Biological, and Chemical (NBC) reconnaissance, today also known or referred to as Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) reconnaissance within the United States Army. Scholars and experts believe that as early as 1935 Chemical-Warfare schools publications discussed the need to identify, mark, and produce a method to avoid contaminated areas. Avoidance is the...

Chemical Weapons: The Iraq and Iran War

1425 words - 6 pages Chemical Weapons: The Iraq and Iran War During the 1980’s, the world was in a state of turmoil. The Middle East was as volatile as ever and the Cold War was still in full swing. The Middle East has always been a hot-bed for controversy and conflict; Iraq and Iran are no exception to this norm. By 1980, Iraq had become the second-largest eastern Arab State in population and size (Goldschmidt & Davidson, 2006). However, Iraq aspired to be more,...

Chemical and Biological Agents: Project Coast

1207 words - 5 pages Project Coast was a ploy on using chemical and biological agents on the inhabitants of South Africa; tear gas was not enough for the Prime Minister at the time PW Botha (Gould & Folb, 2002). Botha employed Wouter Basson who headed the program. Basson used a couple of extremely lethal agents such as CX powder and mustard gas. The Apartheid government took aim at political rivals. Project Coast known for research, development, and deploy of...

Biological Impacts of the Chemical Deet

2404 words - 10 pages Biological Impacts of the Chemical Deet This research paper examines the chemical Deet. This chemical was developed by the United States Army to combat swarms of parasitic insects that can be prolific in and around military institutions, and on the battlefield. When the chemical became open to the public, millions of people began using the product for recreation in the outdoors. Therefore, it is important to identify any potential health risks...

The Use of Chemical Weapons in the Tokyo Subway Attack

1657 words - 7 pages The Use of Chemical Weapons in the Tokyo Subway Attack Japan has long enjoyed the enviable reputation of being one of the safest nations in the world. The country has one of the world lowest rates for murder and other violent crime, and the Japanese National Police Agency and local Police forces are often praised as a model of law enforcement efficiency. Tokyo enjoys one of the cleanest, safest and most efficient subway networks in the...

Biological weapons were invented and used several centuries ago, even

824 words - 3 pages Biological weapons were invented and used several centuries ago, even though one may think that biological weapons are a modern invention. During the French and Indian war, in mid-1700, British soldiers gave smallpox-infested blankets to American Indians with hopes that they get infected and will die. This might seem as a very primitive example of the biological warfare, but at that time there were no advanced technologies to cultivate and...

Project Coast: South Africa’s Top Secret Chemical and Biological Weapon Program

1938 words - 8 pages To protect the safety of the country and people of South Africa, those who hold authority or control in the decision making process sometimes are faced with making tough decisions. When it comes to South Africa, President P. W. Botha decided that to best protect the welfare of the citizens, a defensive measure must be established that was secure and efficient. The idea of such measures brought on an evolution of a secret chemical and...

The Weapons and Armor of the Renaissance

4769 words - 19 pages 'There is no avoiding war, it can only be postponed...' (Machiavelli) Indeed, this is true, as war has been a part of human culture since the beginning of time. Battles will be fought and wars will wage on; there is nothing that can be done. No matter how many pacts are signed, no matter how extraordinary the leader is, and no matter what race or religion, fighting is as unavoidable as the plague.The Renaissance brought tremendous...

Artillery and Weapons of the Civil War

1577 words - 6 pages Every war, though happens for a reason and bring a better change, is often gruesome. The Civil War broke America in two groups and, at the time, was the war with the most casualties and injured men. As the fight to preserve the Union progressed, so did a number of other areas, such as weaponry and artillery. The advanced technology produced through the Civil War assisted in increasing number of casualties. The North was more fortuitous than the...

The Causes And Effects Of Nuclear Weapons

1738 words - 7 pages The Effects of Nuclear Weapons During the Cold War Nuclear Weapons played a prime factor in the rise of the Cold War and ultimately our lives today. Some say the Cold War started during the Bolshevik revolution in 1917 (Kennan 36). Others say it was when Russia dropped its first atomic bomb. Though most believe that it started after the United States and Union of...

Advantages and Uses of Biofuels

633 words - 3 pages Definition: According to Dr Andrew Zimmerman Jones, the Definition of energy is: Energy is the capacity of a physical system to perform work. Energy exists in several forms such as heat, kinetic or mechanical energy, light, potential energy, electrical, or other forms (1) A simpler definition is: Energy is the ability to do work and cause change (2) Renewable vs. non renewable: The definition of bio fuels: “Bio fuel is...

Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Warfare Essay

1128 Words5 Pages

Nuclear, Biological and Chemical Warfare

Nuclear, Biological and Chemical (NBC) warfare is one of the most dreaded forms of attack on the battlefield. In the last century, we learned a great deal about how life works, how it is organized. We have used that technology to save many lives by curing diseases and vaccinating against viruses. But it seems that whenever we have a breakthrough in science, there is an ever-present danger of a form of weapon resulting from the discovery. Biological Warfare is defined as bacteria, viruses, fungi or rickettsia, which are used in wartime to cause disease or death in people (Hay, 1984). It seems like a contradiction. Doctors work hard to find cures and vaccinations for the various diseases…show more content…

To cause an epidemic, an enemy would select a highly contagious virus or bacteria. They would decide whether to use an extremely lethal agent or one that would temporarily incapacitate a population or army to weaken defenses. Most biological weapons are influenza viruses or pneumonic plague bacillus. These meet the requirement of being highly contagious by human contact. As an example, an estimated 20 million people died in the great influenza pandemic of 1918 and 1919 -- just three percent of those infected. Surprisingly, then, this great loss of life actually represents a low mortality rate (Solomon, 1999). For incapacitating the target, brucellosis is preferred. This is a chronic infection caused by the Brucella species of bacteria. A person can be infected by skin contact, by eating or drinking infected material, or by inhaling the organism. This is also an agent that can be produced easily in fermenters. Symptoms vary, but common are a severe chill, a recurring fever, sweating, headache, loss of appetite, extreme exhaustion, aching joints and depression. The symptoms last upwards of four weeks, but relapses can continue for years (Hay, 1984). The most well known form of brucellosis is anthrax. Aggressors favor this primarily because it is lethal and relatively easy to manufacture. Anthrax is caused by the bacterium bacillus anthracis, and is spread by skin contact, contact with infected animals, or

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