Cultural Teachings Self Concept Essay

  • Ahlquist, R. (1992). Manifestations of inequality: Overcoming resistance in a multicultural foundations course. In C. A. Grant (Ed.), Research & Multicultural Education (pp. 59-105). Bristol, PA: The Falmer Press.Google Scholar

  • Allinder, R. M. (1994). The relationship between efficacy and the instructional practices of special education teachers and consultants. Teacher Education and Special Education 17:86-95.Google Scholar

  • Allport, G. W. (1979). The Nature of Prejudice (25th ed.). Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.Google Scholar

  • Bandura, S. A. (1982). Self-efficacy mechanism in human agency. American Psychologist, 37(2): 122-147.Google Scholar

  • Bandura, S. A. (1986). Social Foundations of Thought and Action: A Social Cognitive Theory. Englewood Cliffs, NJ: Prentice Hall.Google Scholar

  • Bandura, S. A. (1987). Self-efficacy: The Exercise of Control. New York: W. H. Freeman.Google Scholar

  • Banks, J. A. (1994). Multiethnic Education: Theory and Practice (3rd ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.Google Scholar

  • Banks, J. A. (1995). Multicultural education: Historical development, dimensions, and practice. In J. A. Banks and C. A. McGee Banks (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Multicultural Education (pp. 3-24). New York: Simon and Schuster Macmillan.Google Scholar

  • Banks, J. A. (1997). Teaching Strategies for Ethnic Studies (6th ed.). F. Helland (Series Ed.). Needham Heights, MA: Allyn and Bacon.Google Scholar

  • Banks, C. M. (2001). Becoming a cross-cultural teacher. In C. F. Diaz (Ed.), Multicultural Education in the 21st Century (pp. 171-183). New York: Addison-Wesley Educational Publishers Inc.Google Scholar

  • Barrett, C. M. (1983). The relationship of self-concept and principled thinking among college juniors and seniors (Doctoral dissertation, Indiana University, 1983). Dissertation Abstracts International 44(8):A2356.Google Scholar

  • Battle, J. (1992). Culture-free Self-esteem Inventories: Vol. 1(1). New York: Council for the Humanities.Google Scholar

  • Beck, A. T., Steer, R. A., Epstein, N., and Brown, G. (1990). Beck self-concept test. Psychological Assessment 2:191-197.Google Scholar

  • Brown, E. L. (1998). The relevance of self-concept and instructional design in transforming Caucasian preservice teachers' monocultured world-views to multicultural perceptions and behaviors (Doctoral dissertation, The University of Akron, 1998). Dissertation Abstracts International, 59(7):A2450.Google Scholar

  • Brown, E. L. (2000). Developing the ethical multicultural classroom tenets of preservice teachers: A social cognitive instructional model, Journal on Excellence in Teacher Education, 9(3):81-108.Google Scholar

  • Brown, E. L. (2002). Mrs. Boyd's fifth-grade inclusive classroom: A study of multicultural teaching strategies, Urban Education, 37: 1126-1141.Google Scholar

  • Brown, E. L. (2004a). What precipitates change in cultural diversity awareness during a multicultural course: The message or the method, Journal of Teacher Education, 55(4): 325-340.Google Scholar

  • Brown, E. L. (2004b). Overcoming the challenges of stand-alone multicultural courses: The possibilities of technology integration. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 12(4): 573-597.Google Scholar

  • Byrne, B. (1996). Measuring self-concept Across the Life Span: Issues and Instrumentation. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.Google Scholar

  • Canter, D. (Ed.) (1985). Facet Theory: Approaches to Social Research. New York: Springer-Verlag.Google Scholar

  • Conforti-Prato, M. L. (1995). A study of students' self-concept in relationship to their teachers' self-concept, ethnicity and gender in selected middle-level grades in a large metropolitan public school system (Doctoral dissertation, Loyola University of Chicago, 1995). Dissertation Abstracts International, 56(1):A0042.Google Scholar

  • Cronbach, L. J. (1984). Essentials of Psychological Testing (4th ed.). New York: Harper and Row.Google Scholar

  • Davis, L. E. (1993). An investigation of the cultural sensitivity level of elementary preservice teachers (Doctoral dissertation, Mississippi State University, 1993). Dissertation Abstracts International 54(07):A2458.Google Scholar

  • Davis, L. E., and Turner, J. S. (1993, November). An investigation of the cultural sensitivity level of elementary preservice teachers, Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association. ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. Ed 372 054.Google Scholar

  • Davis, L. E., and Whitner, I. V. (1994, November). Preservice teachers and culturally diverse families: How do they perceive one another? Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Mid-South Educational Research Association. ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. Ed 37283 680.Google Scholar

  • Deering, T. E. (1995). Preservice field experience as a multicultural component of a teacher education program. Journal of Teacher Education, 46(5):390-394.Google Scholar

  • Dilworth, M. E., and Imig D. G. (1995). Professional Teacher Development and the Reform Agenda. Washington, DC: ERIC Clearinghouse on Teaching and Teacher Education. ERIC Document Reproduction Service NO. EDO-SP-94-1.Google Scholar

  • Erikson, E. H. (1980). Identity and the Life Cycle. New York: W. W. Norton.Google Scholar

  • Fitts, W. H. (1965). Tennessee Self-concept Scale: Manual. Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.Google Scholar

  • Fitts, W. H., and Warren, W. L. (1996). Tennessee Self-concept Scale: TSCS:2 (2nd ed.). Los Angeles: Western Psychological Services.Google Scholar

  • Flanagan, D. F. (1995). Multicultural knowledge and attitudes of pre-service teachers. Masters Abstracts International 33(6):1644, AA11361910.Google Scholar

  • Fried, J. (1993). Bridging emotion and intellect: Classroom diversity in process. College Teaching, 41(4):123-128.Google Scholar

  • Gall, M., Borg, W., and Gall, J. (1996). Educational Research: An Introduction. White Plains, NY: Longman.Google Scholar

  • Gay, G. (1995). Curriculum theory and multicultural education. In J. A. Banks and C. A. McGee Banks (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Multicultural Education (pp. 25-43). New York: Simon and Schuster Macmillan.Google Scholar

  • Gay, G. (2000). Culturally Responsive Teaching: Theory, Research and Practice. New York and London: Teachers College Press.Google Scholar

  • Gordon, B. M. (1995). Knowledge construction, competing critical theories, and education. In J. A. Banks and C. A. McGee Banks (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Multicultural Education (pp. 184-199). New York: Simon and Schuster Macmillan.Google Scholar

  • Grant, C. A., and Secada, W. G. (1990). Preparing teachers for diversity. In W. R. Houston, M. Haberman, and Sikula (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Teacher Education (pp. 403-422). New York: Macmillan Publishing Company.Google Scholar

  • Haberman, M. (1989). More minority teachers. Phi Delta Kappan, 70(10):771-776.Google Scholar

  • Hadaway, N. L. (1988). Multicultural Education: What Educators Know, What They Need to Know. Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Association of Colleges for Teacher Education. New Orleans, LA.Google Scholar

  • Hamachek, D. E. (1982). Encounters with Others: Interpersonal Relationships and You. New York: Holt, Rinehart and Winston.Google Scholar

  • Henry, G. B. (1986). Cultural Diversity Awareness Inventory 1/4 Inventorio Sobre el Reconocimiento de Diversas Culturas. Hampton, VA: Hampton University, Mainstreaming Outreach Project. ERIC Document Repordution Service No. ED 282 657.Google Scholar

  • Henry, G. B. (1995). Determining the reliability and validity of the cultural diversity awareness inventory (CDAI) (Multicultural Education) (Doctoral dissertation, Texas A&M University, 1995), Dissertation, Abstracts International, 56(9):A3483.Google Scholar

  • Hodgkinson, H. L. (1992; 2002). A Demographic Look at Tomorrow. Washington DC: Institute for Educational Leadership, Inc. ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 359 087.Google Scholar

  • Howard, G. R. (1999). We Can't Teach What You Don't Know: White Teachers, Multiracial Schools. New York: Teacher's College Press.Google Scholar

  • Irvine, J. I. (1992). Making teacher education culturally responsive. In M. E. Dilworth (Ed.), Diversity In Teacher Education (pp. 779-792). San Francisco: Jossey-Bass.Google Scholar

  • Keith, L. K., and Bracken, B. A. (1996). Self-concept instrumentation: A historical and evaluative review. In B. Bracken (Ed.), Handbook of Self-concept: Developmental, Social, and Clinical Considerations (pp. 91-170). New York: John Wiley and Sons.Google Scholar

  • Kohlberg, L. (1984). The Psychology of Moral Development. San Francisco: Harper & Row.Google Scholar

  • Ladson-Billings, G. (1995). Multicultural teacher education: Research, practice, and policy. In J. A. Banks and C. A. McGee Banks (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Multicultural Education (pp. 747-759). New York: Simon & Schuster Macmillan.Google Scholar

  • Larke, P. J. (1990). Cultural diversity awareness inventory: Assessing the sensitivity of preservice teachers. Journal of the Association of Teacher Educators 12(3):23-30.Google Scholar

  • Lehman, P. R. (1993). The emotional challenge of ethnic studies classes. College Teaching, 40(4):134-137.Google Scholar

  • Lickona, T. (1988, April). Kohlberg and moral education: Back to virtue. Journal of Conseling and Values, 32(3):187-192.Google Scholar

  • Marcus, H., and Nurius, P. (1986). Possible selves, American Psychologist, 41(9):954-969.Google Scholar

  • Marks, M. (1980). Moral development, educational attitudes and self-concept in beginning teacher education students. Report No. SP-016-144. ERIC Document Reproduction Service No. ED 190 486.Google Scholar

  • Marsh, H. (1993). The multidimentional structure of academic self-concept: In variance over gender and age. American Educational Research Journal, 30:841-860.Google Scholar

  • Marsh, H. W., and Richards, G. E. (1987). Tennessee self-concept scale: Reliability, internal structure, and construct validity. Journal of Personality & Social Psychology, 55:612-624.Google Scholar

  • McDiarmid, G. W., and Price, J. (1993). Preparing teachers for diversity: A study of student teachers in a multicultural program. In M. J. O'Hair and S. J. Odell (Eds.), Diversity and Teaching: Teacher.Google Scholar

  • Nieto, S. (1998). From claiming hegemony to sharing space: Creating community in multicultural courses. In R. Chavez and J. O'Donnell (Eds.), Speaking the Unpleasant: The Politics of (Non) Engagement in the Mulitcultural Education Terrain (pp. 16-31). Albany: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar

  • Noel, J. (1995). Multicultural teacher education: From awareness through emotions to action. Journal of Teacher Education 46(4):267-273.Google Scholar

  • Pajares, F., and Miller, M. D. (1994). Role of self-efficacy and self-concept beliefs in mathematiacal problem solving: A path analysis. Journal of Educational Psychology, 86:193-203.Google Scholar

  • Pines, A. L. (1985). Toward a taxonomy of conceptual relations and implications for the evaluation of cognitive structures. In L. West and A. L. Pines (Eds.), Cognitive Structure and Conceptual Change (pp. 101-115). Orlando: Academic Press.Google Scholar

  • Richardson, V. (1996). The role of attitudes and beliefs in learning to teach. In J. Sikula, T. Buttery, and E. Guyton (Eds.), Handbook of Research on Teacher Education (2nd ed.). New York: Macmillan.Google Scholar

  • Roid, G. H., and Haladyna, T. M. (1982). A Technology for Test-item Writting. New York: Academic Press.Google Scholar

  • Ryan, K. (1992). The moral education of teachers. In G. F. McLean (Series Ed.), and K. Ryan and T. Lickona (Vol. Eds.), Foundations of Moral Education: Vol. 3. Character Development in Schools and Beyond (2nd ed., pp. 287-304). Washington, DC: Council for Research in Values and Philosophy.Google Scholar

  • Shavelson, R. J., Hubner, J. J., and Stanton, G. C. (1976). Self-concept: Validation of construct interpretations, Review of Educational Research, 46:407-441.Google Scholar

  • Sleeter, C. E. (1995a). Reflections on my use of multicultural and critical pedagogy when students are white. In C. E. Sleeter and P. L. McLaren (Eds.), Multicultural Education, Critical Pedagogy, and the Politics of Difference (pp. 415-437). Albany, NY: State University of New York Press.Google Scholar

  • Sleeter, C. E. (1995b). White preservice students and multicultural education course work. In J. M. Larkin and C. E. Sleeter (Eds.), Developing Multicultural Teacher Education Curriculum (pp. 17-30). Albany, NY: State University of New York.Google Scholar

  • Sleeter, C. (2001). Preparing teachers for culturally diverse schools: Research and the overwhelming presence of whiteness. Journal of Teacher Education, 52(2):94-106.Google Scholar

  • Sleeter, C. E., and Grant, C. A. (1999). Making Choices for Multicultural Education: Five Approaches to Race, Class, and Gender (3rd ed.). Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Macmillan Publishing Company.Google Scholar

  • Sparks, R. (1987). The relationship between selected teacher personality factors, student selfconcept and student ratings of teachers (Doctoral dissertation, University of Arkansas, 1987). Dissertation Abstracts International, 48(5):A1118.Google Scholar

  • Stewart, B. L. (1991). Level of moral development, critical thinking and self-concept in college students (Doctoral dissertation, Michigan State University, 1991). Dissertation Abstracts International, 52(9):A3203.Google Scholar

  • Valentine, G. (1997). Get real! Teaching tolerance strategies that work. NEA Today 15(5):4-6.Google Scholar

  • Walsh, A. (1990). Statistics for the Social Sciences: With Computer Applications. New York: Harper & Row.Google Scholar

  • West, L., and Pines, A. L. (1985). Introduction. In L. West and A. L. Pines (Eds.), Cognitive Structure and Conceptual Change (pp. 1-7). Orlando: Academic Press.Google Scholar

  • Woolfolk, A. E., and Hoy, W. K. (1990). Prospective teachers' sense of efficacy and beliefs about control. Journal of Educational Psychology 82:81-91.Google Scholar

  • Self-concept, or self-identity, refers to the ideas one holds regarding himself or herself. These ideas refer to one's sexual preferences, academic mind, cultural/racial identity, personality, and physical characteristics. Communication with others greatly depends upon how one compares himself or herself to others, the environment, personal anxieties, and the people around.

    For example, a person who is homosexual may communicate very well (openly) with other homosexuals. On the other hand, if the same person is around...

    Self-concept, or self-identity, refers to the ideas one holds regarding himself or herself. These ideas refer to one's sexual preferences, academic mind, cultural/racial identity, personality, and physical characteristics. Communication with others greatly depends upon how one compares himself or herself to others, the environment, personal anxieties, and the people around.

    For example, a person who is homosexual may communicate very well (openly) with other homosexuals. On the other hand, if the same person is around people he or she considers to be homophobic, the conversation can be strained. The person may try to hide who he or she really is based upon internal shame felt.

    Another example of a situation, where a conversation may be strained or easy-going, could be one where a person feels uncomfortable regarding the cultural or racial environment. For example, an African American man may feel uncomfortable around a group of southern whites. The conversation would be guarded (most likely). On the other hand, if the African American was around a group of other African Americans, he would feel the same (as the previous example) and conversation would be more easy-going.

    In some cases, people who feel below others (in any way) may not choose to converse in a group setting. Instead, he or she may choose to stay quiet (feeling self-conscious about what he or she could add). The person may feel as if he or she were to say something that he or she would be judged (given the lack of "equality").

    Other people have very strong self-concepts. These people will have a conversation with anyone at anytime. Nothing makes them feel out of place, and they thrive in social settings.

    0 Replies to “Cultural Teachings Self Concept Essay”

    Lascia un Commento

    L'indirizzo email non verrà pubblicato. I campi obbligatori sono contrassegnati *