Narrative Therapy Essay Papers

Narrative Therapy And Family Therapy Essay

Research Question

Why is externalising a central technique in narrative therapy today, and what are the limitations and successes of this technique?

Research

The research complied for this report was gathered from various Journals dedicated to the discourse surrounding the practices of narrative therapy and family therapy. Search terms used to collect relevant articles were ‘narrative therapy’, ‘Michael White’ and ‘externalising’. The results from these terms were extensive and required narrowing further by way of peer reviewed status, content type and discipline. Data gathered was then critically analysed to explicate firstly, the socially constructed knowledge surrounding the process of narrative therapy, and the technique of externalising. Secondly, any discrepancies or conflicts in the discourse related to the application of the externalising technique. And lastly, the successes, efficacy, and limitations of externalising as a technique. There was no primary research conducted in the process of compiling this report.

Literature Review

Narrative therapy was introduced to the family therapy field in the late 1980’s by therapists Michael White and David Epston (Matos et al. 2009, p.89). A philosophy of narrative therapy is that everyone has a story to tell which is bound by the socially constructed knowledge within their cultural setting, and this story can be better interpreted by contextualising it according to the individual’s language, social, political and cultural situation (Combs & Freedman 2012, p.1036; Etchison & Kleist 2000, p.61; Fernandez 2010, p.16). The narrative is then reduced to the theme which is determined as a problematic element within the story, and perceived internally as a dominating power (Mascher 2008, p.58; Matos et al. 2009, p.89). The negative themes which cause stress or problematic behaviours commonly manifest when an individual’s experiences are inconsistent with the perception of their ideal self (Phipps & Vorster 2011, pp.138, 139; Carr 1998, p.486), which is derived from the socially constructed knowledge within the individual’s culture. Furthermore, the process of narrative therapy enables the client to re-narrate their story, giving it a richer and more productive meaning. It is a narrative therapist’s position to work with the individual to define the context of the problem, deconstruct the problem saturated story and constitutionalise or redefine a richer narrative (Carr 1998, p.487; Combs & Freedman 2012, p. 1034).
The sequential paradigmatic techniques of narrative therapy are a systematic approach of: collaboratively positioning with the client, externalising the problem, extracting unique outcomes, thickening new plots, linking the new plots back to the past and extending them into the future and finally, extending the new plots to the understandings of the individuals immediate outsiders (Carr 1998). After establishing an understanding of the language the individual uses and the context...

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A Reflection On Narrative Therapy Essay

IntroductionThere are quite a few different themes which structure what has come to be recognized as 'narrative therapy' and every single therapist connects with these ideas to some extent differently. When you hear somebody talk about 'narrative therapy' they may be referring to certain techniques of understanding individual's identities. As a substitute, they may be referring to certain techniques of understanding troubles and their effects on individual's existence. They may also be speaking about certain techniques of talking with individuals about their existence and troubles they may be experiencing, or certain techniques of understanding therapeutic relationships as well as the ethics or politics of therapy (Epston & White, 2000).

What is narrative therapy?Narrative therapy seeks to be a deferential, non-blaming approach to psychoanalysis and societal work, which centers individuals as the experts in their own existence. It views troubles as separate from individuals and assumes individuals have quite a few skills, competencies, beliefs, principles, commitments as well as abilities that will help them to decrease the influence of troubles in their existence.

There are a variety of principles which notify narrative techniques of working, but in my view, two are mainly important: techniques maintaining a position of curiosity, and techniques asking questions to which you authentically do not know the replies.

CollaborationSignificantly, the individual consulting the therapist plays an important role in mapping the way of the journey. Narrative conversations are interactive in collaboration with the individuals consulting the therapist. The therapist seeks to recognize what is of interest to the individuals consulting them and how the expedition is suiting their preferences. You will often hear, for instance, a narrative therapist asking:* How is this discussion going for you?* Should we keep speaking about this or would you be more curious in talking about …?* Is this appealing to you? Is this what we must spend our time chatting about?* І was thinking if you would be more concerned in me asking you some more regarding this or whether we must emphasize on something that you would like to talk about like X, Y or Z? [X, Y, Z being other options]In this technique, narrative conversations are led and directed by the wellbeing of those who are consulting the therapist.

DiscussionNarrative therapy is every now and then known as concerning 're-authoring' or 're-storying'...

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